Name: 
 

USH 14 P



Multiple Choice
Identify the choice that best completes the statement or answers the question.
 

 1. 

What led to the flood of Irish immigrants entering the United States in the mid-1840s?
a.
potato blight
b.
unsafe working conditions
c.
religious persecution
d.
violent revolution
 

 2. 

What did the Know-Nothing Party support?
a.
one year residency period before immigrants could gain U.S. citizenship
b.
border patrol to keep sick foreigners from bringing diseases into the country
c.
immigration restrictions to protect the jobs and culture of native-born Americans
d.
education for immigrants who wanted to be involved in the political process
 

 3. 

Read the quotation below and answer the question that follows.

“People that cuts a great dash [style] at home ... think it strange [in the United States] for the humble class of people to get as much respect as themselves.”

--Patrick Dunny, quoted in Who Built America?
by Bruce Levine et al.

What does this quotation express?
a.
the new feeling of equality immigrants enjoyed in the United States
b.
immigrants’ appreciation of the economic opportunities in the United States
c.
the unfairness of skilled immigrants’ being forced into low-wage jobs
d.
immigrants’ fear of losing political power in a democratically-run state
 

 4. 

The majority of German immigrants who came to the United States in the late 1840s came because the United States had
a.
high-paying skilled jobs.
b.
economic opportunity and freedom from government control.
c.
freedom of religion.
d.
political refuge and support for the revolutionaries at home.
 

 5. 

What led to the emergence of the middle class during the 1800s?
a.
the nativist movement’s success
b.
declining interest in manufacturing
c.
the growth of industry and cities
d.
improved factory conditions
 

 6. 

The term “middle class” refers to the
a.
social and economic level between the wealthy and the poor.
b.
educational rank reformers assigned to intermediate schools.
c.
factory standard used for goods of average cost and quality.
d.
political term for citizens who vote for moderate candidates.
 

 7. 

Which of the following was commonly found in American cities in the mid-1800s?
a.
criminal activity
b.
public fire departments
c.
crowded subways
d.
sanitation services
 

 8. 

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Henry David Thoreau were all
a.
Romantic artists.
b.
social reformers.
c.
religious revivalists.
d.
transcendentalist thinkers.
 

 9. 

The writings of transcendentalist thinkers often touched upon which theme?
a.
self-reliance
b.
devotion
c.
charity
d.
revolution
 

 10. 

Walt Whitman’s simple, unrhymed poetry often expressed the importance of which American values?
a.
organized religion and faith
b.
patriotism and independence
c.
reason and logical thought
d.
individualism and democracy
 

 11. 

Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allen Poe, and Emily Dickinson were
a.
founders of the common-school movement.
b.
writers during the Romantic period.
c.
thinkers who defined transcendentalism.
d.
leaders of the Second Great Awakening.
 

 12. 

Which of these ideas did religious leader Charles Grandison Finney express?
a.
Doing good deeds is not proof of faith.
b.
Religious leaders alone can be free from sin.
c.
Men are closer to God than women are.
d.
Salvation is in the hands of the individual.
 

 13. 

The temperance movement was a
a.
faith-based initiative to restrict the use of alcohol to religious ceremonies.
b.
commercial bid to ban the manufacture of hard liquor and beer by private sellers.
c.
scientific study of the side-effects of daily alcohol consumption on adult males.
d.
reform effort to urge people to use self-discipline to stop drinking hard liquor.
 

 14. 

What did reformer Dorothea Dix do to contribute to the prison reform movement in the early 1800s?
a.
spoke of the horrid conditions of prisons and inspired the building of separate facilities for the mentally ill
b.
founded an organization of women that worked together to provide education for imprisoned criminals
c.
organized many protests in hopes of motivating the government to build separate facilities for child offenders
d.
brought America’s attention to the need for prison reform by writing novels detailing the condition of prisons
 

 15. 

Members of the common-school movement believed that all children should
a.
learn in the same place regardless of their backgrounds.
b.
receive the bulk of their education at home.
c.
learn a trade in school rather than study academic subjects.
d.
attend school for eight hours a day, every day.
 

 16. 

Which of these contributions did Horace Mann make to the education reform movement in the 19th century?
a.
He developed new ways of instructing students with handicaps.
b.
He fought for improvements to the education of women.
c.
He extended the length of the school year.
d.
He was responsible for the integration of public schools.
 

 17. 

Which of the following is a result of Thomas Gallaudet’s contribution to education?
a.
free American schools for the deaf and those with hearing-impairments
b.
public schools that have the same quality of education as private schools
c.
educational textbooks for children with different levels of ability
d.
reading and writing materials for visually impaired users of the Roman alphabet
 

 18. 

What did Catherine Beecher do to reform education in the United States in the mid-1800s?
a.
founded an all-female academy and wrote many essays stressing the importance women’s education
b.
fought for improvements in the training of teachers and the quality of educational materials in the United States
c.
lobbied Congress to increase the budget of public schools and to lengthen the school year for students
d.
opened the first university in the United States focused on the education and enlightenment of women
 

 19. 

In the mid-1800s, leaders of free African American communities in the North were often influenced by
a.
utopian communities and their focus on cooperation.
b.
Romantic writers and their questioning of Puritanism.
c.
the Second Great Awakening and its spirit of reform.
d.
the temperance movement and its emphasis on self-discipline.
 

 20. 

What did the education reform movement bring about on behalf of free African Americans during the mid-1800s?
a.
affordable private schools
b.
scholarships for African Americans to attend top universities
c.
integrated public colleges
d.
schools for African American children in several cities
 

 21. 

Why were many African American schools established in Philadelphia in the mid-1800s?
a.
Of all northern U.S. cities, Philadelphia had the largest African American population.
b.
As a center of Quaker influence, Philadelphia strongly supported the education of African American children.
c.
Laws in other northern cities barred freed African Americans from receiving any kind of education.
d.
Philadelphia’s citizens believed that establishing African American schools would help the abolitionist cause.
 

 22. 

To spread the abolitionist message throughout the United States in the mid-1800s William Lloyd Garrison
a.
published an antislavery newspaper called the Liberator.
b.
wrote many novels and poems about the injustices of slavery.
c.
traveled around the country giving lectures about the evils of slavery.
d.
founded the American Colonization Society to help slaves obtain freedom.
 

 23. 

What was Angelina and Sarah Grimké’s contribution to the abolitionist movement?
a.
founding the African colony of Liberia and leading many slaves to safety there
b.
representing the Quaker viewpoint, which challenged slavery on religious grounds
c.
providing jobs and financial support to many fugitive slaves living in the North
d.
writing to attract other white southern women to the effort to abolish slavery
 

 24. 

What was the goal of the American Anti-Slavery Society?
a.
provision of economic assistance for free African Americans
b.
relocation of all southern slaves to free land in the North
c.
punishment for the inhumane treatment of slaves by slaveholders
d.
immediate emancipation and racial equality for African Americans
 

 25. 

What contribution did Harriet Tubman make to the antislavery movement?
a.
As a conductor on the Underground Railroad, she led many fugitive slaves to freedom.
b.
She lectured members of the American Anti-Slavery Society about the evils of slavery.
c.
As the founder of a southern antislavery group, she helped stage many peaceful slave strikes.
d.
She wrote many essays persuading southern slaveholders to join the abolition movement.
 

 26. 

Study the quotation below and answer the question that follows.

“The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common ... The Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice. I must mourn.”

—Frederick Douglass, quoted in From Slavery to Freedom
by John Hope Franklin and Alfred A. Moss Jr.

What can you infer Frederick Douglass meant by “blessings”?
a.
wealth, privilege, and status, which society affords to every white American
b.
joy and light-heartedness, which enslaved people like himself could not feel
c.
freedom and independence, which white Americans won for themselves in 1776
d.
faith and grace, which enslaved people did not find in the Christian church
 

 27. 

What did Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth have in common?
a.
They had each learned to read and write as children, despite laws against it.
b.
The Anti-Slavery Society invited each of them to give regular lectures.
c.
They were both former slaves who contributed to the abolitionist cause.
d.
The autobiography was their chosen form for exposing the injustices of slavery.
 

 28. 

What effect did Nat Turner’s Rebellion of 1831 have on southern society?
a.
Many slaveholders freed their slaves.
b.
People stopped discussing slavery openly.
c.
Mob violence over the slavery issue increased dramatically.
d.
More whites began hiding fugitive slaves.
 

 29. 

The women’s movement for equal rights was an offshoot of the
a.
temperance movement.
b.
education reform movement.
c.
abolitionist movement.
d.
prison reform movement.
 

 30. 

Why did Sarah Grimké decide never to get married?
a.
Her sister had been involved in an unhappy marriage.
b.
She wanted to dedicate herself entirely to the abolitionist cause.
c.
Laws of the day gave husbands complete control over his wife’s property.
d.
She believed that couples should live together without being married.
 

 31. 

Women’s work in the reform movement benefited the movement for women’s rights by
a.
attracting men to the women’s movement.
b.
raising money for the women’s movement.
c.
taking legal control of wives’ property from husbands.
d.
illustrating that the sexes were different, not unequal.
 

 32. 

Which of the following is true about the situation of women in the 1800s?
a.
Large cities allowed women to vote in local elections.
b.
Federal law did not permit women to serve on juries.
c.
Women asking for equality were punished by law.
d.
Only married women could manage their own property.
 

 33. 

What argument did some women make against the movement for equal rights?
a.
Public speaking and political activism were unladylike.
b.
Inequality between the sexes was natural and good.
c.
Social and moral reform should come from within the home.
d.
Women and men were different rather than unequal.
 

 34. 

What right did Susan B. Anthony win for women in New York in 1860?
a.
control by married women of their own wages and property
b.
participation by women in the voting and election process
c.
integration of women at all public conventions and events
d.
opportunity for all women to hold even the highest public office
 

 35. 

The Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 was significant because it
a.
forced the government to discuss petitions against slavery.
b.
marked the start of the organized women’s rights movement.
c.
granted women the right to participate in the voting process.
d.
revealed the need for temperance and educational reforms.
 

Completion
Complete each statement.
 

 36. 

The growth of industry and cities in the United States led to the development of a new social class called the _____________________. (middle class/working class)
 

 

 37. 

The ____________________________ was a movement of Christian renewal that swept through the United States during the 1790s and early 1800s. (Great Awakening/Second Great Awakening)
 

 

 38. 

Reformer _____________________ spoke to the state legislature of Massachusetts about the conditions in which the mentally ill were forced to live. (Dorothea Dix/Margaret Fuller)
 

 

 39. 

_______________________ published a newspaper called the Liberator to gain support for the abolitionist movement. (Henry David Thoreau/William Lloyd Garrison)
 

 

 40. 

_________________________ led a campaign to change laws concerning a woman’s right to own property. (Susan B. Anthony/Catharine Beecher)
 

 

True/False
Indicate whether the statement is true or false.
 

 41. 

The Know-Nothing Party was established to assist immigrants as they settled into life in the United States.
 

 42. 

The period of Christian renewal in the United States during the 1790s and early 1800s took place only in the North.
 

 43. 

American reformers wanted to limit people’s alcohol intake because they believed that alcohol abuse was the cause of many social problems in the United States.
 

 44. 

Angelina and Sarah Grimké were antislavery activists of the 1830s who tried to convince southern women to join the abolitionist movement.
 

 45. 

The antislavery movement inspired many women to join together to begin the women’s rights movement.
 

Matching
 
 
Match each item with the correct statement below.
a.
utopian communities
b.
Walt Whitman
c.
Frederick Douglass
d.
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
e.
Seneca Falls Convention
f.
Catharine Beecher
g.
Underground Railroad
h.
tenements
i.
Harriet Tubman
j.
transcendentalism
k.
Horace Mann
l.
Romanticism
 

 46. 

poorly designed apartment buildings that were home to large numbers of people
 

 47. 

escaped slave who succeeded in leading over 300 slaves to freedom on the Underground Railroad
 

 48. 

first public meeting about women’s rights held in the United States
 

 49. 

educational reformer who began the first all-female school in Connecticut
 

 50. 

escaped slave whose autobiographies intended to expose the injustices of slavery
 

 51. 

organization designed to help fugitive slaves escape to the North
 

 52. 

philosophical movement stating that people should rise above the material things in life
 

 53. 

groups of people who joined together to try to form perfect societies
 

 54. 

women’s rights activist who was one of the organizers of the Seneca Falls Convention
 

 55. 

Romantic poet who praised American individualism and democracy
 



 
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